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Apr 07

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ADHD Allies Facebook Page: Unbranded Social Media, Tricia Geoghegan (14 minutes)
Watch the video and please visit our video sponsor, Klick Pharma.

Johnson & Johnson’s Tricia Geoghegan reveals all the details behind their ADHD Moms and ADHD Allies Facebook pages.

  • Shows the business case to sell senior leadership
  • How they created a moderated discussion board
  • Importance of Terms of Use
  • Handling AEs in Facebook comments
  • Ads pull better than SEM efforts
  • Hard metrics including fans, page views, and screener downloads
  • Triggers that spike page views

WORKSHOPS
for Pharma & Health Communications
================================

Each one-day boot camp is led by Kevin Kruse and is limited to only 15 participants to maximize individual attention. Sign-up now to get a 50% early bird discount.

  • Social Media for Pharma - Just Announced! (May 18, 2010)
  • Ask about in-house workshops for e-patient strategy, social media compliance and metrics

e-Patient Connections 2010

Mar 30

WebMD Health ExchangeWebMD is the most trusted online health brand, gets more traffic than any other health site, and they just launch WebMD Health Exchange. Every other startup online health community out there should be petrified. It’s like owning the town five and dime and having WalMart show up. It’s too early to tell the impact the WebMD communities will have, but they have smartly setup communities moderated by their experts (driving quality and more trust) but also allow anyone to create their own exchange which will allow for innovation and more traffic.

Big questions ahead…who will be the first big pharma to sponsor an official “exchange” in their therapeutic area? Should a big brand hospital setup their own communities, or grab some virtual land under the WebMD banner? Are Facebook fan pages still the way to go, or can you get higher quality health-targeted members on WebMD?

What do you think the impact of WebMD Health Exchange will have on health communications?

epatien-small-banner-20103

Mar 28

Previously I wrote about one panelist’s good answer to Jen McCabe’s question, “How come consumers aren’t rushing to adopt these personal health solutions?” But someone on the panel gave a really bad answer, too. He said:

“Consumer health apps and devices are taking off because people won’t pay for stuff.”

That answer got a second vote on the panel and most in the room nodded in agreement. That answer is wrong and while it might make us feel better because it implies it’s not our fault, it disempowers us as health marketers.

First let me acknowledge that it is hard to get people to pay for stuff. It’s why companies like Sermo, Patients Like Me, and others that don’t want to go out of business are rushing into the arms of Pharma. If you can’t make your money on ad revenue (and unless you’re a top 5 health site you can’t) and you can’t get consumers to pay (it’s hard) then you go to the people sitting on tons of money–pharma. Lot of people gnash their teeth at this fact but as a consumer I’d rather have a free solution with a pharma logo on it then to have no solution at all. But I digress…

So people won’t pay for stuff, huh? Seems to me that people love paying for stuff. They pay a lot for all kinds of stuff including beer, video games, stupid movies, porn, sports cars, designer handbags, ridiculously expensive watches and chia pets.

We just don’t make decisions rationally. We choose short term pleasure even if there is long-term pain. It’s easy to spend money on things that make us feel good now, even if there are consequences down the road.

It’s really hard to get off my damn couch and workout. After all, it freakin’ hurts. It’s really hard to take that pill that is going to make me nauseous now, when my disease doesn’t seem to be that bad this week. And if the health problem is something that I can’t see or feel, I just can’t relate. I know these cheese fries are going to make my cholesterol go up, but I can’t see it or feel it happening. And besides, I’ll eat salads next week to make up for it won’t I?

So back to selling your mobile health doodad, your patient community, monitoring device, whatever. Dig deep, and think about the immediate benefits. I wish it weren’t so, but that’s what you have to sell. You can do it subtly, you can do it with finesse, you can use a message ladder to adjust to your audience but that’s the secret.

Harley isn’t selling a motorcycle, they are selling the power of middle aged paunchy executives to be able to leather up, roar into town and scare the crap out of old ladies and kids.

We act–we change our behaviors–from an emotional response, not a logical one. I fought this truth for too many years in too many of my businesses but now this truth empowers me: We decide with emotion, we justify with logic.

A couple years ago at Kru we did an exhaustive research study of people with chronic insomnia. It’s a widespread problem, a serious health issue, and yet most people will never talk to their doctor about it or take any serious action to remedy it. There were of course different segments within this population, but by and large what we found was that people didn’t really care much about sleep, but they do want to be alert in the day.  They don’t really care about insomnia, but they do want to have the energy to play catch with their kids, make love to their spouses, and drive their daughters safely to their troop meetings. It’s a desire for energy (just think about all those “Five Hour Energy” power drink commercials).

Don’t get confused, this isn’t classic feature-benefit stuff. If you take that straightforward approach then you’ll think the benefit is “health” or “no headache” or “real time monitoring” and you’ve got it wrong. It’s the benefit you get after the benefit.

People do spend money on stuff. But it’s on the stuff they care about, not the stuff you care about.

epatien-small-banner-20102

Mar 28

“You need two things to get mass consumer uptake. Design and distribution.” That was the smartest thing I heard at the Everywhere Healthcare conference in Vegas last week. It was Zeo co-founder Ben Rubin’s answer to Jen McCabe’s simple question:

“How come consumers aren’t rushing to adopt these personal health solutions?”

Lord knows there are many other ingredients in the secret potion for consumer success, but I’d have to say that design and distribution are indeed at the top of the list. Design doesn’t just mean form or physical design-it’s the whole “experience design.” But what I want to focus on is the second “D” for distribution.

For consumers to adopt your health-widget, it needs to be readily available and promoted. The more places the better. The success of the iPod has as much to do with the iTunes music distribution channel as it does with a sleek but simple mp3 device.

Have much do you think about distribution? If you have a unique personal health device perhaps distribution channels could include Brookstone, gyms or fitness centers, running stores, weight loss centers, yoga schools, the  list could go on and on.

But even if your “product” isn’t a product, blow your mind and think about distribution. Just brainstorm for awhile. Promoting your health system or hospital? That’s local and (of course) you are offering authentic value through educational programs, right? But WHERE are you offering those? Only on your own website? Only through quarterly newsletter mailings? Again, think of all the other health channels in your area. Think of the people interested in your program-what else are they interested in? Maybe distribution is local fitness coaches, health food stores, senior centers, day care centers, etc.

Promoting a prescription starter kit or co-pay coupon for your product? It still works the same way. Think about who else reaches your target health consumer and see if you can partner in some way.

If you want to drive health consumer adoption of your product or service, think distribution.

epatien-small-banner-20101

Feb 18

Leveraging Generational Theory for Health Marketing
Carlen Lea Lesser, (7 minutes) watch video

  • Pecha Kucha style (20 slides, 20 seconds per slide)
  • Strauss & Howe Generational Theory
  • Boomers in Fourth Turning
  • Which Star Wars characters map to which generations? (you might be surprised!)

WORKSHOPS
for Pharma & Health Communications
================================

Each one-day boot camp is led by Kevin Kruse and is limited to only 15 participants to maximize individual attention. Sign-up now to get a 50% early bird discount.

e-Patient Connections 2010

Feb 10

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Marketing Mayo Clinic, Lee Aase (20 minutes)

  • Power of word of mouth marketing
  • Top 7 reasons patients choose Mayo Clinic
  • Series of tactics from new media to social media
  • Total cost of Mayo Clinic e-marketing = $0
  • Social media pyramid (ie, right number of servings per day)
  • The Mayo video that generated over 6 million views

WORKSHOPS
for Pharma & Health Communications
================================

Each one-day boot camp is led by Kevin Kruse and is limited to only 15 participants to maximize individual attention. Sign-up now to get a 50% early bird discount.

SAVE THE DATE: e-Patient Connections 2010!
=====================================
September 27-29, 2010, Philadelphia Hyatt Bellevue

Feb 05

This movie requires Flash Player 9

Johnson & Johnson on YouTube, Rob Halper (10 minutes) watch video

  • Who’s Watching YouTube? Everybody.
  • Health searches and views on YouTube
  • Metrics, metrics, metrics
  • Two-way interaction with viewers
  • Selling the idea internally and overcoming obstacles

WORKSHOPS
for Pharma & Health Communications
================================

Each one-day boot camp is led by Kevin Kruse and is limited to only 15 participants to maximize individual attention. Sign-up now to get a 50% early bird discount.

SAVE THE DATE: e-Patient Connections 2010!
=====================================
September 27-29, 2010, Philadelphia Hyatt Bellevue

Jan 22

cover_twitterThis new, free 40-page guide for health marketers and communicators has just been released. In Using Twitter for e-Patient Communications you’ll get:

  • Case studies from J&J, Detroit Medical Center, American Public Health Association
  • Complete Twitter tutorial for beginners
  • Double your followers by optimizing your Twitter profile
  • Expert insights from Dana Lewis (#HCSM) and John Pugh (Boehringer Ingelheim)
  • The Listen, Inform, Engage adoption mode
Click here to download this free guide.

WORKSHOPS
for Pharma & Health Communications
================================

Each one-day boot camp is led by Kevin Kruse and is limited to only 15 participants to maximize individual attention. Sign-up now to get a 50% early bird discount.


SAVE THE DATE: e-Patient Connections 2010!
=====================================
September 27-29, 2010, Philadelphia Hyatt Bellevue.

Jan 21

Authentic Value and e-Patient Communities
“e-Patient Dave” deBronkart

(18 minutes) watch video

  • How he became an e-patient, beat cancer and earned the “e-Patient Dave” moniker
  • The patient of the future
  • His special message for Novartis
  • Be real. Contribute value. Be known.
WORKSHOPS
for Pharma & Health Communications
================================
Each one-day boot camp is led by Kevin Kruse and is limited to only 15 participants to maximize individual attention. Sign-up now to get a 50% early bird discount.


SAVE THE DATE: e-Patient Connections 2010!
=====================================
September 27-29, 2010, Philadelphia Hyatt Bellevue.

Jan 07

How J&J Joined the Twittersphere video_monseau1
Marc Monseau, Johnson & Johnson

(14 minutes) watch video

  • How to establish legal and regulatory “guard rails”
  • The importance of an online personality
  • How did a 120 year old conservative company become a Twitter innovator?
WORKSHOPS
for Health Communications and Marketing

==============================================
Each one-day boot camp is led by Kevin Kruse and is limited to only 15 participants to maximize individual attention. Sign-up now to get a 50% early bird discount.


SAVE THE DATES: e-Patient Connections 2010!
======================================
The conference that generated all the buzz last year will return to the Philadelphia Hyatt Bellevue from September 27-29, 2010. New partners and an exciting new format will be unveiled later this month. Make sure to sign-up for all the updates at www.epatient2010.com.